John, Jesus, and History (S19-327)

11/19/2011 
 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Room: 2001 - Convention Center


Theme: Media and Method: Reading John and Jesus in an Oral/Aural Context


Jaime Clark-Soles, Southern Methodist University, Presiding


Richard A. Horsley, University of Massachusetts Boston

The Whole Story: Rethinking John's Gospel as a Source for Jesus in Its Ancient Media Context (30 min)


Tom Thatcher, Cincinnati Christian University

There Are No "Aporias": Orality, Memory, and Narrative Aesthetics (30 min)


Hellen Mardaga, Catholic University of America

Bis repetita placent. Some Reflections on Repetitions, Orality and John 18:36 (30 min)


Catrin Williams, University of Wales: Trinity Saint David

Memory, Scripture, and Tradition in the Gospel of John: Insights from Ancient Media Studies (30 min)


Break (5 min)


Discussion (25 min)

Bible in Ancient and Modern Media
 (S19-312)

Joint Session With: Bible in Ancient and Modern Media, Mark


11/19/2011
4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Salon 10 - Marriott Marquis


Theme: The Case for Mark Composed in Performance


Joanna Dewey, Episcopal Divinity School, Presiding


Antoinette Wire, San Francisco Theological Seminary, Introduction (15 min)


Ancient Media Context

Whitney Shiner, George Mason University, Respondent (20 min)

Pieter Botha, University of South Africa, Respondent (20 min)


Break (5 min)


Markan Literature

Rikki Watts, Regent College, Respondent (20 min)

James Voelz, Concordia Seminary, Respondent (20 min)


Response

Antoinette Wire, San Francisco Theological Seminary, Respondent (15 min)


Discussion (35 min)

Social History of Formative Christianity and Judaism
 (S19-239)

11/19/2011 
 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM  
Room: Golden Gate C2 - Marriott Marquis

Theme: Sight and Sound in Early Judaism and Christianity

Gil Klein, Franklin & Marshall College, Presiding (5 min)


Kim Haines-Eitzen, Cornell University

Imagining Sound and Silence (25 min)


Amy Papalexandrou, University of Texas at Austin

Listening to the Late Antique Soundscape in Early Christian and Jewish Sacred Space (25 min)


Georgia Frank, Colgate University

Last Sensed: Ritualizing the Ascension of Jesus in Late Antique Christianity (25 min)


Rachel Neis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Hath Not a Jew Eyes? (25 min)

Discussion (30 min)


Business Meeting (15 min)

Ritual in the Biblical World
 (S19-237)

11/19/2011  
1:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Room: Salon 3 - Marriott Marquis

Russell C.D. Arnold, DePauw University, Presiding


James R. Getz Jr., Temple University
Sacrificial Typology and Nazarite’s Burning Hair (25 min)


Discussion (5 min)


Daniel Belnap, Brigham Young University
If The Lord Delight In Us: Divine Reflexivity in the Hebrew Bible (25 min)


Discussion (5 min)


Petra Dijkhuizen, University of South Africa

Investigating Ritual Risk, Ritual Failure and Ritual Efficacy in Pauline Corinth (25 min)


Discussion (5 min)


Jade Weimer, University of Toronto

Musical Ritual in the Pauline Churches: The Slippery Slope of a Necessary Social Practice in Antiquity (25 min)


Discussion (5 min)


Jonathan Schwiebert, Lenoir-Rhyne University
Ritual and Ethics: The Didache as Test Case (25 min)


Discussion (5 min)

Performance Criticism of Biblical and Other Ancient Texts
 (S19-230)

11/19/2011
  1:00 PM to 3:30 PM 
Room: Intercontinental Ballroom B - Intercontinental


Theme: Repetition in Performance


Glenn Holland, Allegheny College, Presiding


Shamir Yona, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Repetition of a Word or Root in Biblical Poetry, Once as an Isolated Word and Once in a Construct Genitive Chain (25 min)


Gary A Rendsburg, Rutgers University
Repetition with Variation: Element of Style and Facet of Performance (25 min)


Jeanette Mathews, Charles Sturt University

Rethinking Repetition in the Book of the Twelve as Examples of “Ready-mades” in Improvised Performance (25 min)


Break (10 min)


Meda Stamper, Anstey United Reformed Church
Performing the Ending of the Gospel of John (25 min)


Lee A. Johnson, East Carolina University

Paul’s Damascus Road Experience: A Thrice-Told Tale in Acts (25 min)


Discussion (15 min)

John, Jesus, and History
 (S19-126)

Joint Session With: John, Jesus, and History, Bible in Ancient and Modern Media


11/19/2011
  9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Room 3003 - Convention Center


Theme: The Fourth Gospel in First-Century Media Culture


This session is a panel review of The Fourth Gospel in First-Century Media Culture, ed. Anthony Le Donne and Tom Thatcher (T&T Clark, 2011). The main themes of the book will be summarized by the editors, and the panel and open discussions will focus on general themes raised by the book (interpreting FG within its ancient media context), not on its specific contents. Panelists will assume that those who attend the session have NOT read the book beforehand.
Anthony Le Donne, Lincoln Christian University, Presiding


Overview: The Fourth Gospel in First-Century Media Culture


Tom Thatcher, Cincinnati Christian University, Introduction (20 min)


The Ancient Media Context


Jonathan Draper, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Respondent (20 min)


Holly Hearon, Christian Theological Seminary, Respondent (20 min)


Break (5 min)


The Johannine Literature


Jaime Clark-Soles, Southern Methodist University, Respondent (20 min)


R. Culpepper, Mercer University, Respondent (20 min)


Break (5 min)

Orality, Print Culture and Biblical Interpretation

A film by Eugene Botha

Orality_Print_Culture_VideoIn this controversial new film the ramifications of Orality Studies and its impact on New Testament Studies are explored by a number of prominent Biblical scholars like Werner Kelber, Jimmy Dunn, Phil Towner, David Rhoads, David Carr, Gosnell Yorke, James Maxey and others. The interface of Orality Studies and Performance Criticism and the implication of this for Bible Translation are also explored. The film is based on the work of an SNTS Seminar which met from 2005-2008.

For more information or to purchase see http://www.eugenebotha.co.za/new.htm

To download a trailer click here.

The Performance of a Lifetime: Audience Participation in the Sermon on the Mount

Kathy Maxwell, South Texas School of Christian Studies

SBL23-137 Performance Criticism of Biblical and Other Ancient Texts Consultation
11/23/2008 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

This paper explores ancient comments about the audience and its participation in rhetorical performance, evidence that is complemented by studying the ancient stage: audience participation was expected and even vital for a performance’s success. Strangely, a prominent tool used to encourage such participation was silence. The striking number of rhetoricians’ comments is supported by evidence that a strategy of silence was used in ancient literature. This literature was likely received aurally—the silences, as well as the words, were to be heard. Modern rhetoricians have named this strategy of silence literary gap theory, and modern audiences have the luxury of the printed text. Passages may be compared and dissected, and many gaps can be filled with relative ease. Long before post-Enlightenment storytelling strategies, however, ancient orators left gaps in narratives, encouraging audiences to become “fellow-workers” (Mor. 48:14) with the speaker. Hearing the silences and working to fill them reveals the power of the gospel performance to capture attentive listeners. The passive listener becomes a fellow-worker, one who also acts and finally, in a sense, “lives” the performance of the gospel. Matthew’s Sermon on the Mount highlights the evangelist’s concern for engaging the audience. An engaged audience at least paid attention and often even helped create within the silent sections of the story, an act that inclined them toward moral formation. This project impacts not only our view of rhetorical abilities of ancient authors, but also the way in which modern readers “hear” narratives. The responsibility of audience participation did not end with the ancient audience. We also bear the responsibility of hearing between the lines, entering into performance with the ancients. We are all the more likely to be persuaded by the argument we help complete, astonished by the words we help speak, and formed by the story we live.

Performing the Torah: The Rhetorical Function of the Pentateuch in the Second Temple Period

James W. Watts, Syracuse University

SBL23-137 Performance Criticism of Biblical and Other Ancient Texts Consultation
11/23/2008 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

The Torah comes equipped with instructions for its own performance: a public reading of the entire scroll before the assembled people of Israel (Deut 31:9-11). The books of Kings and Nehemiah portrays similar ceremonies occurring in 7th and 5th century Jerusalem (2 Kgs 22-23; Neh 8). Yet later liturgical readings have rarely presented the entire Torah scroll at one time. Juxtaposition of biblical depictions of public readings with rhetorical analysis of the Pentateuch’s contents as well as evidence for its uses in the Second Temple period provides a test case for evaluating the possibilities and limitations of performance criticism of ancient texts.

The Analysis of Sound Patterns: Exploiting Aural Exegesis of Ancient Texts

Jeffrey E. Brickle, Urshan Graduate School of Theology

SBL23-137 Performance Criticism of Biblical and Other Ancient Texts Consultation
11/23/2008 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

In recent decades, biblical scholars have become increasingly attentive to the oral/aural nature of ancient texts. In antiquity, texts were typically performed before audiences by being read aloud or recited from memory. Authors thus composed principally for the aural medium, incorporating an array of sound patterns that facilitated retention, interpretation, and response. Although noteworthy advances have been made in identifying these patterns and investigating their role in the composition and auditory reception of documents, the potential of aural exegesis for probing biblical texts still remains largely untapped. This paper attempts to redress this issue by describing various aural devices and underscoring ongoing efforts by scholars to develop methodological approaches to sound analysis. It will also consider how the nature of Greek grammar and syntax lends itself well to aural manipulation, and ways in which pronunciation impacts the overall enterprise. The paper seeks to stimulate discussion on how ancient works were composed for the ear as well as promote the further refinement and application of aural exegesis to biblical texts.

Mayhem in Nahum

Jin H. Han, New York Theological Seminary

SBL23-137 Performance Criticism of Biblical and Other Ancient Texts Consultation
11/23/2008 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

The book of Nahum makes a harsh reading due to its gruesome discourse of devastation. In the Masoretic Text, the scene of destruction is further augmented by the grouping of consonants with plosive qualities (e.g., Nah 1:1; 2:2) and the use of onomatopoeia (e.g., 1:4, 6). Versions and translations leave this feature largely unrepresented except in 2:10a (cf. bûqâ ûmebûqâ ûmebullaqâ “Desolation, devastation, and destruction!” JPS; “Devastation, desolation, and destruction!” NRSV). The paper demonstrates how the audible quality of the Hebrew text of Nahum heightens the portrayal of Nineveh’s downfall.

Singing Moses’ Song

Keith Stone, Harvard University

SBL23-137 Performance Criticism of Biblical and Other Ancient Texts Consultation
11/23/2008 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

The Song of Moses (Deut 32:1–43) may have a much earlier origin than the materials that surround it in the later layers of Deuteronomy, and conjectures about the Song’s original performance setting cannot be more precise than those made in general for early Hebrew poetry. However, the framing material in Deuteronomy makes certain explicit prescriptions for the Song’s performance, very similar to what is prescribed for the Torah itself. Observing that performance implies the enactment of characters appearing within a composition as well as the recollection or re-enactment of the personas of earlier performers—when this takes place within a tradition of performance—this paper will examine the elaborate ways in which performing and performed characters interact in the Song of Moses and will relate this interaction to what may be surmised about the goals of the Deuteronomic writers.

Mnemonic Socialisation in Ephesians: Tradition, Ideology, and Otherness in the Communal Remembering

Minna Shkul, University of Helsinki

SBL22-122  Mapping Memory: Tradition, Texts, and Identity

11/22/2008  4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

This paper explores three ways in which Ephesians uses remembering to transform and guide the community of non-Israelite Christ-followers it addresses. The text uses remembering to provide ideological resources and to reinforce social boundaries, selecting and deselecting different mnemonic components, shaping early Christian tradition and identity through the text. Firstly, Christ is remembered in a unique way that sanctions appropriate cultural performances. Secondly, the reputation of Paul is constructed to legitimate the writer’s socio-ideological positionings and to delegitimate alternative views. The reputations of both of these contested Israelites are shaped to connect the community with the agents of God who fulfilled his eternal plans and inaugurated a multi-ethnic people of God celebrated in the discourse. Thirdly, Ephesians remembers Israel as the covenant people and other nations as having deficient identity, superimposing a negative view of other ethnicities for the purposes of resocialisation and communal coherence. Ephesians rejects non-Israelite cultural heritage and anchors ‘the nations’ to Israel’s God remembering their otherness and inclusive work of Christ. Thus Ephesians invents traditions, transforms reputations and decomposes existing memories to suit the ideology of the group, the writer’s cultural position and the communal goal of self-enhancement. Thus in Ephesians we have a post-apostolic text which demonstrates that the shaping and controlling of remembering is an essential part of the emerging early Christian tradition and social orientation. Furthermore, it highlights the fluid and negotiable connections between social environs and ideology of the mnemonic community, and the way communal influencers may shape both memory and forgetting.

The Memory of Moses and the Israelites in Paul’s Appeal to Reconciliation in 1 Corinthians

Finn Damgaard, University of Copenhagen

SBL22-122  Mapping Memory: Tradition, Texts, and Identity

11/22/2008  4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

I take as my starting point, Margaret M. Mitchell’s illuminating approach to 1 Corinthians as an appeal to reconciliation in her "Paul and the Rhetoric of Reconciliation" (Louisville 1992). It is my thesis that the memories of Moses and the Israelites’ seditions in the wilderness play a crucial role for Paul’s appeal to reconciliation not only in 1 Cor 10:1-11 but throughout the letter. In the paper, I examine the way these narratives function as master commemorative narratives. By pointing to the narratives of Moses and the Israelites as a narrative frame for the founding of the Corinthian congregation and the present conflict, Paul tries to revise and re-establish the identity of the Corinthians. It is argued that the factions with which Paul is concerned in 1 Corinthians are keyed to the memories of the factions against Moses. Paul read these narratives in 1 Corinthians in the light of the ancient topos of factionalism (stasis) and uses them to make certain points about the proper behaviour of the Corinthian community. Just as he propagates a memory of Moses as struggling for concord (omónoia) among the Israelites in the wilderness, so Paul pictures himself as playing a crucial role in this strategy of identification as the one who continues the struggle of Moses in his own day. By invoking a memory of these narratives that fits Paul’s aim, he seeks to structure the collective memory of the Corinthians and reconstruct their identity as a unified community. Paul’s appeal to reconciliation is an appeal through collective memory.

Charting Memory Cycles in the Gospels: A Case for Historical Triangulation

Anthony Le Donne, Durham University

SBL22-122  Mapping Memory: Tradition, Texts, and Identity

11/22/2008  4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Historical memory is a cyclical process of projection and assimilation. New perceptions are refracted through the lens of previous categories and old categories are forced to evolve to remain intelligible. One of the central tenets of Social Memory theory is that memory (both personal and historical) is a fluid process, able to accommodate new perceptions. The function of memory is to conceptually reinforce and be reinforced by new perceptions for the purpose of creating cognitive continuity and stability. Because of this, many prominent memory theorists such as Michael Schudson and Jan Assmann readily assert that all "memory is distortion" since there is no such thing as an "undistorted memory." This insight helps to dismantle the historical-positive tendency to draw a dichotomy between reliable memory and distorted perception. This paper will adapt previous historiographical discussions of the “hermeneutical circle” by discussing the ebb and tide from novum to pre-conception. I will argue that recent research on memory distortion (what I call mnemonic refraction) sheds new light on the circle model. When applied the Jesus tradition, the historian is able to navigate past the authenticity vs. redaction dichotomy that has bankrupted historical-positivism. I will argue that when redaction tendencies are treated as “mnemonic refraction” certain memory trajectories become evident in the Jesus tradition. Once located, these trajectories can be charted backward to a sphere of historical plausibility. If a single saying or story is refracted along multiple trajectories there is warrant for postulating (i.e. triangulating) what an early and widespread memory of the historical Jesus might have looked like—one that best accounts for the refraction trajectories manifest in the Gospels.

Memory of the Conquest or the Conquest of Memory?

The “Conquest Tradition” of Joshua in the Book of Psalms—A Social Memory Reading

Ovidiu Creanga, King’s College London

  SBL22-122  Mapping Memory: Tradition, Texts, and Identity

11/22/2008  4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

 

Returning to a classical debate regarding the ‘re-presentation’ of history in the Book of Psalms, well established in the German scholarship of the latter half of the last century (Lauha 1945; von Rad 1958; Noth 1960; Westermann 1981), this paper investigates the depiction of Joshua’s conquest of the land (Josh. 1-12) in the Psalter from the point of view of social memory theory. While it is generally known that references to the Mosaic period occur frequently in the historical Psalms, the conquest of the land by Joshua struggles to achieve literary expression. Briefly, the situation can be presented in this way: references to the exodus from Egypt occur far more frequently than those to the conquest of the land, and allusions to the conquest of Transjordania under the leadership of Moses crop up far more commonly than to the conquest of Cisjordania by Joshua. This state of things invites a close examination of why the Psalter dis/(re)members Joshua’s conquest tradition in the way it does, and how to relate the Psalms’ portrayal of Israel’s settlement with that of the Hexateuch and/or the Deuteronomistic History. Starting with the newly developed theory of ‘repositioning of cultural memory in literature’ (van Gorp & U. Musarra-Schroeder 2000; Grabe 2005), the paper first identifies which layers of the memory of settlement exist in what literary genres. Since the cult is the main laboratory of Israel’s public memory, offering ‘un cadre social and mate´riel’ to the settlement tradition, tracing its reformulation in the preexilic, exilic and postexilic psalms offers an opportunity to reveal, in the second part of this paper, the intricate politics of remembering/forgetting with the tradition of Joshua's conquest and the re/formation of Israel’s identity as a settled people.

The Role of the Sage: Ben Sira at the Boundary

Benjamin G. Wright III, Lehigh University

SBL22-38 Wisdom and Apocalypticism in Early Judaism and Early Christianity

11/22/2008  9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

 

The Wisdom of Ben Sira has been held up as one of the parade examples of wisdom literature, and over the years that the Wisdom and Apocalypticism Section has been in business, we have set this book against a variety of texts, both those usually designated wisdom, such as 4QInstruction, and those designated apocalyptic, such as 1 Enoch. But a closer look at Ben Sira reveals why the categories of wisdom and apocalyptic are so problematic. In this paper, I want to try to pull together a nexus of issues to illustrate this claim and that connect the three questions we are focusing on this year. Ben Sira’s use of sources, the performance modes signaled by the text, and the reception mode along the orality-textuality spectrum are linked together by the way that Ben Sira constructs the place of the sage in his social world and the authority that he claims for his instruction. In short, as Richard Horsley and Pat Tiller have argued, in this period the scribe/sage occupied an important position in the Judean Temple state. As one who prepares young students to assume the role of the scribal retainer in the centers of power, Ben Sira not only teaches them the things they need to know, he must work to construct their identities so that they can play their proper role. In order to accomplish these ends, Ben Sira legitimates the authority of his teaching and his position as a sage through a number of legitimacy conferring strategies. So, for example, he exploits the discourse of parenthood to construct his students as his children. The ways that he uses the first person creates an ideal sage, an exemplar, to whom they can look and with whom he identifies himself. In this light, the fact that Ben Sira does not employ citations of Hebrew scripture in his book, but thoroughly incorporates his sources into his instruction becomes more readily understandable. These issues have been discussed in relative isolation from each other, but in this paper, I want to examine them together in order to see what kind of a picture of the sage that Ben Sira offers us. The mechanisms that he employs to pursue these goals further highlight the conflicted boundaries between wisdom and apocalyptic.

SBL24-105

Bible in Ancient and Modern Media

11/24/2008

4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Room TBD - Hotel TBD

Theme: Remembrance and Adaptation

 

Holly Hearon, Christian Theological Seminary, Presiding

 

Timothy Stone, University of St. Andrews-Scotland

Ruth, Figured In, Figured Out, and Reconfigured: The Compilational History of Ruth in the Canon (30 min)

Emily Cheney, Athens, GA

Retelling Ruth’s and Naomi’s Journeys Home (30 min)

Cynthia M. Baker, Bates College

Job’s Rabbinic Descendant (30 min)

Linzie Treadway, Vanderbilt University

The Sire of Sorrow or the Story We Hate to Tell? Popular Media’s Response to and Construction of the Job Narrative (30 min)

William John Lyons, University of Bristol

The Apocalypse and Its (Many, Modern) Mediators: John's Revelation, Johnny Cash’s The Man Comes Around, Zack Snyder’s Dawn of the Dead, and the Videographers of YouTube (30 min)

SBL24-87

Performance Criticism of Biblical and Other Ancient Texts Consultation

11/24/2008

1:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Room: Room TBD - Hotel TBD

Theme: Book Review: Terry Giles & William B. Doan, Twice-Used Songs: Performance Criticism of the Songs of Ancient Israel (Hendrickson)

 

Glenn Holland, Allegheny College, Presiding

 

 

Linda Day, Pittsburgh, PA, Panelist (20 min)

 

Shimon Levy, Tel-Aviv University, Panelist (20 min)

 

Terry Giles, Gannon University, Respondent (15 min)

 

William Doan, Miami University, Respondent (15 min)

 

Discussion (20 min)

SBL24-33

Orality, Textuality, and the Formation of the Hebrew Bible

11/24/2008

9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Room: Room TBD - Hotel TBD

Theme: Toward a More Adequate Theory of the Verbal Art

 

David Carr, Union Theological Seminary, Presiding

 

 

Amir Eitan, Ben Gurion University of the Negev

The Oral Origin of the Resumptive Repetition (30 min)

 

Edward Silver, University of Chicago

Entextualization and Prophetic Action: Jeremiah 36 as Literary Artifact (30 min)

 

Stefan Schorch, Kirchliche Hochschule Bethel

Reading and the Creation of Texts in the Course of the Literary History of the Hebrew Bible (30 min)

 

Cynthia Edenburg, Open University of Israel

Intertextuality, Literary Competence, and the Question of Readership (30 min)

 

Aaron Demsky, Bar-Ilan University

From Writing Exercise to Literary Composition: The Book of Lamentations (30 min)

 

SBL23-137

Performance Criticism of Biblical and Other Ancient Texts Consultation

11/23/2008

4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Room TBD - Hotel TBD

 

Theme: Provoking Audience Action and Reaction

 

 

Margaret Lee, Tulsa Community College, Presiding

 

Keith Stone, Harvard University

Singing Moses’ Song (25 min)

Jin H. Han, New York Theological Seminary

Mayhem in Nahum (25 min)

Jeffrey E. Brickle, Urshan Graduate School of Theology

The Analysis of Sound Patterns: Exploiting Aural Exegesis of Ancient Texts (25 min)

James W. Watts, Syracuse University

Performing the Torah: The Rhetorical Function of the Pentateuch in the Second Temple Period (25 min)

Kathy Maxwell, South Texas School of Christian Studies

The Performance of a Lifetime: Audience Participation in the Sermon on the Mount (25 min)

Bernhard Oestreich, Theologische Hochschule Friedensau

Oral Performance before a Split Audience: Letter Reading in Rome, Galatia, and Corinth (25 min)

SBL22-122

Mapping Memory: Tradition, Texts, and Identity

11/22/2008

4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Room TBD - Hotel TBD

Theme: Memory, the Past, and Identity

  

Alan Kirk, James Madison University, Presiding

   

Ovidiu Creanga, King’s College London

Memory of the Conquest or the Conquest of Memory? The “Conquest Tradition” of Joshua in the Book of Psalms—A Social Memory Reading (25 min)

Anthony Le Donne, Durham University

Charting Memory Cycles in the Gospels: A Case for Historical Triangulation (25 min)

Finn Damgaard, University of Copenhagen

The Memory of Moses and the Israelites in Paul’s Appeal to Reconciliation in 1 Corinthians (25 min)

Minna Shkul, University of Helsinki

Mnemonic Socialisation in Ephesians: Tradition, Ideology, and Otherness in the Communal Remembering (25 min)

Break (5 min)

Werner Kelber, Rice University, Respondent (15 min)

Discussion (30 min)

SBL22-103

Bible in Ancient and Modern Media

11/22/2008

4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Room TBD - Hotel TBD

Theme: Bible in Ancient and Modern Media Section after Twenty-Five Years

 

Richard Swanson, Augustana College, Presiding

 

Thomas Boomershine, United Theological Seminary, Panelist (30 min) 

Holly Hearon, Christian Theological Seminary, Panelist (15 min) 

Joanna Dewey, Episcopal Divinity School, Panelist (15 min) 

Arthur Dewey, Xavier University, Panelist (15 min) 

Break (15 min)

Robert Fowler, Baldwin-Wallace College, Panelist (15 min) 

David Rhoads, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, Panelist (15 min) 

Discussion (30 min)

Other Papers at SBL 2008 to consider

 

AH21-68

Academy of Homiletics

11/21 2:45 PM to 5:30 PM

Theme: Workgroup: Performance Studies

  

SBL22-38

Wisdom and Apocalypticism in Early Judaism and Early Christianity

11/22 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Theme: Conflicted Boundaries and Sapiential Modalities?

 

Benjamin G. Wright III, Lehigh University

The Role of the Sage: Ben Sira at the Boundary (30 min)

  

SBL22-81

Wisdom and Apocalypticism in Early Judaism and Early Christianity

11/22 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Theme: Conflicted Boundaries and Apocalyptic Modalities?

 

Matthias Henze, Rice University

The Other Synoptic Problem: 2 Baruch and 4 Ezra (30 min)

  

Ellen Bradshaw Aitken, McGill University

Singing in a Heavenly Vision: Scriptural Practices in the Songs of Revelation (30 min)

  

SBL22-132

Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Early Christianity

11/22 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Theme: Case Studies in Religious Experience

 

Samuel Thomas, California Lutheran University

Vision, Interpretation, Mediation: Textuality and Experience in Qumran Literature (20 min)

  

SBL23-20

Hebrew Scriptures and Cognate Literature

11/23 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

 

John W. Hilber, Dallas Theological Seminary

Egyptian Prophecy in Broader Ancient Near Eastern Perspective (30 min)

  

SBL23-67

Ecological Hermeneutics

11/23 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM

 

Peter Perry, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago

“The Things Having Lives”: Ecology, Allusion, and Performance in Revelation 8:9 (25 min)

  

SBL23-125

Homiletics and Biblical Studies

11/23  4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

 

Ruthanna Hooke, Virginia Theological Seminary

Performance as a Bridge between Biblical Interpretation and Proclamation (25 min)

  

SBL24-5

Bible, Myth, and Myth Theory

11/24 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Theme: The New Testament and Myth

 

Christopher Mount, DePaul University

“I Know a Person in Christ Who Fourteen Years Ago Was Caught up to the Third Heaven”: Myth and Religious Experience in the Religion of Paul (30 min)

  

SBL24-89

Pseudepigrapha

11/24 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM

 

Hans Arneson, Duke University

Theatricality in 4 Maccabees (30 min)

  

SBL24-101

Writing / Reading Jeremiah Group

11/24 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM

 

John Hill, Yarra Theological Union

Jeremiah the Book (30 min)

  

SBL25-23

Ritual in the Biblical World

11/25 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Theme: Ritual and Iconography

 

Gerald A. Klingbeil, Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies and Martin G. Klingbeil, Helderberg College

“Mirrors of the Dance”: Finding the Interplay between the Static and the Dynamic in Biblical Ritual and Ancient Near Eastern Iconography (25 min)

  

SBL25-27

Theology of the Hebrew Scriptures

11/25 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

 

Helmut Utzschneider, Augustana-Hochschule

“… But Mine Eye Seeth Thee!” (Job 42:5): The Book of Job and an Aesthetic Theology of the Old Testament

 

boston.jpg SBL 2008 Boston

November 22-25 2008

Sections related to Performance Criticism

 

SBL22-103 Bible in Ancient and Modern Media

11/22 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Fairfax B - SH

Theme: Bible in Ancient and Modern Media Section after Twenty-Five Years

 

SBL22-122 Mapping Memory: Tradition, Texts, and Identity

11/22 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Meeting Room 310 - CC

Theme: Memory, the Past, and Identity

 

SBL23-137 Performance Criticism of Biblical and Other Ancient Texts Consultation

11/23 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Meeting Room 309 - CC

Theme: Provoking Audience Action and Reaction

 

SBL24-33 Orality, Textuality, and the Formation of the Hebrew Bible

11/24 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Room: Lincoln - HI

Theme: Toward a More Adequate Theory of the Verbal Art

 

SBL24-87 Performance Criticism of Biblical and Other Ancient Texts Consultation

11/24 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Room: Beacon H - SH

Theme: Book Review: Terry Giles & William B. Doan, Twice-Used Songs: Performance Criticism of the Songs of Ancient Israel (Hendrickson)

 

SBL24-105 Bible in Ancient and Modern Media

11/24 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Meeting Room 301 - CC

Theme: Remembrance and Adaptation

 

Other Papers relevant to Performance Criticism

SBL 2009 New Orleans

NewOrleansNovember 21-24 2009

Sections related to Performance Criticism


21-204a

Bible in Ancient and Modern Media

11/21/2009
1:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Room:
Napoleon B1 - SH
Theme: Performance Criticism: An Emerging Discipline in New Testament Studies by David Rhoads (2009)



22-107

Bible in Ancient and Modern Media

11/22/2009
9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: Studio 8 - MR
Theme: Telling and Retelling Constitutive Stories


22-140

Ritual in the Biblical World

11/22/2009
9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Room:
Grand Ballroom E - SH
Theme: Theoretical and Methodological Explorations


23-131

Mapping Memory: Tradition, Texts, and Identity

11/23/2009
9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Room:
Grand Ballroom E - SH
Theme: Memory, Manuscript, and Oral Composition


23-139

Performance Criticism of Biblical and Other Ancient Texts Consultation

11/23/2009
9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: Bacchus Suite - MR

Other Papers relevant to Performance Criticism